What Border-Crossers Leave Behind in the Mexican-American Desert

On Monday October 7, please join the BorderWork(s) Lab and Humanitarian Challenges Focus for an evening with photographer Susan Harbage Page at Duke Univeristy (7pm; FHI Garage – C105, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse).  


This event is part of the weekly series Monday Nights @ BorderWork(s) (go to http://sites.fhi.duke.edu/borderworks/monday-nights-with-borderworks-speaker-series-returns/  

Harbage Page’s work is currently on view at Duke’s Nasher Museum of Art, in an installation also featuring Pedro Lasch and Yinka Shonibare (http://nasher.duke.edu/exhibitions/lasch-page-shonibare/). Focused on the human consequences of the creation and regulation of borders, this exhibit is linked with Lines of Control: Partition as Productive Space (http://nasher.duke.edu/exhibitions/lines-of-control/) and Defining Lines: Cartography in the Age of Empire (http://nasher.duke.edu/exhibitions/defining-lines/), both at the Nasher and co-sponsored by BorderWork(s).  For more information on the exhibits and related events, please see:http://sites.fhi.duke.edu/borderworks/borderworks-the-nasher/

In US-Mexico Border Project and other works, Harbage Page examines the experience of crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, documenting in visual terms the effect such journeys have on material objects and, by extension, their human carriers. In a series of photographs, Harbage Page captures objects—such as a wallet, a lone argyle sock and scraps of fabric and paper—left behind as migrants crossed the U.S.-Mexican border. These items are no longer possessions but rather documents testifying to a life that has moved on, reminding us of what else may have been left behind: family, friends, and home. They serve as haunting reminders of the past as well as symbols of hope for the future.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s